iasku Communication App for Autism

iasku communication app

App: iasku

Developer: n3o Digital

Platform: iPad, iPhone, iPod Touch (English)

Price: $4.99  Download iAskU

Category: Education

 

Pictures Worth a Thousand Words

Looking for a wonderful communication app for autism?

A picture is definitely worth a thousand words to an ASD child. They thrive on pictures, visual schedules, and anything else visual. Most autistic children are either language-delayed or if on the lower end of the spectrum, non-verbal.

A group of psychologists, speech therapists, and developers at n3o Digital has created iasku, a great app that teaches autistic children how to communicate interactively using pictures.

 

Doing the Work

Following the Picture Exchange Communication System (PECS) the app uses pictures and unique hand-over activities.

 

No Audio – By Design!

iask is designed without audio to encourage children to physically communicate with parents, therapists, and teachers using the iPad. This communication app for autism uses easy-to-understand symbols and lets users customize and create their own symbols for specific items.

For example, when using iasku, the child selects an item card they want and physically shows the iPad to their therapist so the therapist can respond. When the child selects their item, a red hand appears, prompting them to tap the hand then pass the iPad to the therapist for a response.

 

 

After the red hand is tapped, the screen confirms the child’s question and provides a wonderful hand exchange visual for the child to hand over the iPad to their therapist (parent or teacher).

 

 

When the therapist responds, they can choose Yes, Not available, or Wait to communicate with the child. This type of learning has proven, with my own son and his therapist who uses PECS, that it keeps their attention, motivates them to want to do the work, and most importantly, shows them how to communicate.

 

Creating Categories

The app is divided into categories such as food, drink, help, outside, and toys.

If you tap the Admin button at the top, right you can create your own category, which just great!

On the Admin page, the following are tappable:

  1. Create category to create categories
  2. Delete category to delete categories
  3. Create item card to create a picture card that fits in new category
  4. Buy categories where you can purchase categories

 

 

I absolutely love this feature! Once your category is created, create a new item card using your own pictures!

 

 

My own ASD son is currently working on holidays, so I created a “Holidays” category by typing the name in the field. Then we can add Christmas, New Years, St. Patrick’s Day, Valentines and anything else we want!

 

Customizable Communication App

I love how customizable iasku is. Autistic children, like my son, thrive on familiar items, places, people, and things. You can use your own pictures to really make this app customized to your own child or children’s needs. You can also move item cards from one category to another, rename the item card, and delete and hide them.

 

Drawing a Conclusion

I love this app! I plan to use it with my own son and, as a parent, appreciate the work that has gone into it. It is sure to motivate and encourage autistic children who are both language-delayed and non-verbal to gain confidence knowing they can communicate using the iPad!

 

BUY iasku at iTunes:    Download iAskU

 

Tags: , , ,

Previous post: • Next post:



Proloquo2Go iPad Demo – Click Below to Watch!

Proloquo2Go iPad Demo – Watch It Now!

Who’s Behind Autism Plugged In?

Who’s Behind Autism Plugged In?

My name is Jack Kieffer and I'm a blogger sharing my love of technology at blogs like Cool Gizmo Toys, Greenamajigger, and here at Autism Plugged In where I'm trying to make a difference in the lives of children with autism.

Several years ago, I began volunteering with special needs kids, who gave me much joy and an appreciation for life. This blog is my way of giving back. Any proceeds from this effort are used to support my friends with autism. Read more about Jack or connect with him on Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn.